Guided Meditations for Stress, Anxiety and Depression

This series of guided meditations will move you gradually through a process of turning off everything that is creating the way that you feel, then helping you induce deep relaxation, release and inner peace in order to promote profound inner change. This meditation album is a key part of our 3-week program called Yoga for Chronic Stress, Anxiety and Depression.

Comments

Existing Comments

mjscott88
July 9, 2017
Comment:

Thank you, David, for these beautiful guided meditations. Turn it Off is simply exquisite and it really helped me release tension in my body...in my spirit :) Thanks for your guidance and light.

sophiapol
July 21, 2017
Comment:

I tried the first part of the meditation but I had to stop because when I achieved total relaxation I suddenly felt totally dizzy. That kinda scared me. I will try it again tomorrow though

Melekeda
August 16, 2017
Comment:

very nice, it can be replaced for nidra meditations as well

Purpleme
August 20, 2017
Comment:

Thank you for the effort designing a program for reducing stress, anxiety and depression so thoroughly and with so much compassion. I'm on day 9 now and keep feeling a little alienated to the intention of the meditations as my heart is beating faster and faster the more I am being guided into relaxation. Does any of you recognize this experience?

David Procyshyn
August 26, 2017
Comment:

I imagine that it's probably the fact that you are tuning into body sensations in a way you don't normally. Is it possible that your heart is beating at that rate regularly but you're only noticing it more intimately now?

Purpleme
August 27, 2017
Comment:

Thank you so much for posting my comment and for your reply. Yes, I'm now aware, that my heart rate is rather high most of the time without me noticing. Eventhough it oftens beats even faster during meditations - maybe because there is suddenly more room for thought as the rest of my body and the surroundings are quieting down. After having tried "Transform yourself" a couple of times I find that this particularly meditation helps me keeping focus on letting go - and my heart likes that beating a bit slower :-) Thank you.

Huronlex
September 25, 2017
Comment:

I loved the suggestions to stop looking for answers. That in itself, helped me to let go. I was surprised that my limbs and head began to feel very tingle. Not sure what that means.

Danny3
October 6, 2017
Comment:

I'm a couple of weeks into the chronic stress programme, and I found these meditations really powerful. I can relax in a way I've struggled to for a long time.

On the technical side, when the first two are finished, the following one gets auto-played. This makes it hard to stay in the space at the end as I have to get up to switch off the next meditation. Is this a setting that can be changed? Could they be in separate players to avoid this?

David Procyshyn
October 12, 2017
Comment:

Thanks for the feedback. It's much appreciated.

Yes, I realize that it autoplays through. There's no way to prevent that from happening, outside of purchasing the tracks and arranging on your mobile device so that it stops.

sbynum@alumni.lsu.edu
October 12, 2017
Comment:

These are some of the best meditations I've ever done. I have not felt this relaxed and centered in 6-7 years. I find myself feeling almost hypnotized by the relief I feel during the meditations. Thank you, David and all at DYWM for bringing relief to my life everyday. I enjoy the authenticity in the yoga and meditation programs so much.

deborahcb
December 2, 2017
Comment:

David, I am doing this as part of your 21-day series and I'm so grateful to you for putting this in a package that gives me a clearer head with intentions to let go of the stress and anxiety I feel on a regular basis. I am carrying these meditations with me through the day, reminding myself to let go of my negative thoughts. Thank you for this journey and for helping me cultivate peace in my life.

David Procyshyn
December 2, 2017
Comment:

Yes! That’s fantastic!

You put a big smile on my face thinking about you letting go of the things that are causing stress in your life. I’m so happy for you.

Stay in touch with your progress, if you like.

Take care,

David

cjbass
December 6, 2017
Comment:

I am in week 2 of the three-week program and am finding it very helpful in allowing myself to be where I am and feel what I feel.

Currently, what I'm feeling is a lot of pain, sadness, and grief. That raises a couple of challenges as I try to let people see me as I really am: 1) my fear that those feelings will drive people away; and 2) the reality that others sometimes try to "fix" my problems (i.e., fix me) rather than meeting me where I am. Any thoughts on this?

David Procyshyn
December 7, 2017
Comment:

It's great to hear that they are helping.

The meditations are designed to remove everything that your mind uses to distract yourself from feeling the stuff that hurts. And, in most cases, the anxiety is there because you have been pushing away the pain, sadness, grief and other painful feelings for a long time. It's not surprising that you don't like those feelings, but that is what is giving them power and longevity.

So, to answer your questions, 1) think about what makes you feel comfortable and safe with other people... the qualities you value in your friends. I bet that for you it's about being genuine. You desperately want that kind of connection with people. The people you love and who love you also want you to be real, to show them who you really are. Also, keep in mind that everyone else is living with their version of this stuff. No one is immune to it. And, the more you feel ok with the vulnerability of exposing your inner stuff and treat your pain with love and acceptance, the less grip it has on your life and the more you encourage others to do the same. 2) You can ask the people you share these thoughts with to just listen, rather than suggest fixes, if that's what you want. Never feel like your pain is too much for your friends and family to handle. Your job is to let go of the guilt that is associated with the burden that you see yourself putting on them.

Let me know if you have any other questions. This is a big topic and can feel like a long journey.... :-)

Take care,

David
DoYogaWithMe Founder

cjbass
December 27, 2017
Comment:

David, thank you for your thoughtful reply. You hit it on the head when you talk about feeling like a burden and fearing that my pain is too much for others to handle (or too much to put up with, which is really how I feel about it). As with everything else on this journey, there are no easy answers — or at least, no easy way to carry out the answers. I keep reminding myself of what you say in the guided meditations: "Stop seeking solutions."

Thank you again for this wonderful series and the whole Do Yoga With Me website, which is truly great.

bukrey
July 8, 2018
Comment:

I am only on week 2. Did you have any success in letting go of thoughts of being a burden ? How do you stay motivated to do meditation And class. Thanks

cjbass
July 9, 2018
Comment:

Hi bukrey,

I have been working on all of these emotional and psychological challenges for a long time: feeling like a burden, feeling like I should be more productive, feeling like I spend too much time (and, perversely, also not enough time) on self-care, etc. They all stem from my deep feelings of inadequacy — of being "not good enough." Yoga and meditation are two of the practices that help. So are psychotherapy, getting outside (preferably into the woods), opening up to family and friends about what I'm feeling, talking kindly to myself, talking back to my inner critic, and trying to reframe my thinking in positive ways.

So to answer your first question: yes, I have been able to reduce the feeling of being a burden. Not eliminate it — at least not yet — but reduce it. The meditations for stress, anxiety, and depression were just one tool in that partial success. All of it is a work in progress! As for motivation: when I decided to start this class, I made a commitment to myself that I would see it through. So I made it a priority in my day and made sure I had enough time to practice every day. And I tried not to expect big changes.

A practice that I started about five months ago and have found very helpful: I keep a daily journal of a) things I'm grateful for, and b) daily successes. I try to do the gratitude part in the morning, to make sure I do it and because it's a good way to start the day. I write the successes later. Successes can be very small, such as not getting upset about something that used to upset me. I have been working on seeing partial progress as success rather than failure (glass half full), and this practice helps a lot with that, because it forces me to think concretely about what went well each day. Sometimes I can't come up with much more than "I am committed to this practice." But that's a lot!

I hope this is helpful, and I hope this class is helpful as well.

Namaste,
Carole

SmileMore
December 28, 2017
Comment:

Hi David. I want to thank you for providing these wonderful meditations to help guide us in finding a quiet place within each of us. I especially like the imagery of creating pathways and "deepening the groove". I have found this to be true: the more often I meditate, the easier it becomes to sink into that deep, restorative place. I'm reading How to Sit by Thich Nhat Hanh, and it perfectly complements your meditations. He says, "In our daily lives, our attention is dispersed. Our body is in one place, our breath is ignored, and our mind is wandering. As soon as we pay attention to our breath, as we breathe in, these three things — body, breath and mind — come together." Many thanks.

Sweet Oranges
May 25, 2018
Comment:

I have been suffering a lot from depression, so I wanted to try this out. I am on day 2 now. I have a question: is it normal to feel uncomfortable emptiness after the guided meditations? Because that's how I feel. I find myself kind of wanting to "get through" the meditation instead of just enjoying the process, even though my mind is focused on the meditation. :/

SmileMore
May 26, 2018
Comment:

Hello, MayoHime. I’m sorry you are struggling with depression. It can be difficult to cope with, but I’ve found that coming here, and sitting with myself and taking time to just breathe can help. In my opinion, there is no such thing as “normal” when it comes to meditation. What is normal for me, may not be normal for you. Give yourself the space to experience something new. Each breath is different from what has come before, and holds within it the promise of something new. Perhaps a quietness — which could come through as “emptiness”— may come over you. Let it be, knowing that you made your way here for a reason.

David Procyshyn
May 29, 2018
Comment:

Hi there.
Thank you for reaching out and sharing. I really appreciate that.
SmileMore is right, there is no normal, no expected way for any of us to feel. Yet, we all do have common ways that we feel each day, sensations or ways of being that are familiar to us. And it's not uncommon that when you sit to meditate, you feel uncomfortable emptiness. What is most important is that it doesn't actually matter what sensations you feel when you pay attention, it matters how you react to them. If you resist or push it away, it will persist and maybe even get stronger. If you feel it openly with judgment, it may feel like it's getting bigger or stronger at first, but it will slowly subside, depending how long it has been a part of your being.
That uncomfortable emptiness is one of your best teachers. It is a part of who you are and the best thing you can do is embrace it, feel it fully and listen. See what you can learn from it. The irony is that as you learn from it, it will shift into something slightly different. Over time, you may realize that the lesson is the fact that nothing remains still - you (and everyone around you) are always changing so there's no point getting attached to any of it.

mega sea urchin
June 11, 2018
Comment:

so i just started with the meditation for my anxiety problems. i tend to overthink things and i want to learn how to "turn my brain off" as my parents say. so, i noticed that in the meditation there were long pauses where there was no audio whatsoever. when the man in the audio told me not to think of anything, and then the audio went silent, my brain instantly started thinking again about why the long pauses were there, would the audio start again, is it paused, et cetera. is there anything i can do to stop thinking?
thank you :)

David Procyshyn
June 11, 2018
Comment:

Hi there.
Your question addresses one of the great mysteries of humanity! How do we stop our crazy monkey minds from driving us mad?!

Everyone feels the same. The mind seems to revel in being overactive. It feels like being busy is its default state, doesn't it?

There are two ways that you can approach this. One - and I know this seems counterintuitive - don't try to change it. If you don't like the fact that your brain is overactive and you want it to change, you are essentially fighting against it. Anytime you fight against what your mind is doing, you make it stronger. So, start by letting go of the need to control your thoughts. This can be really hard to do, but if you continue with it, you will notice that your thoughts will slow down and have less of an effect over you. The key is to have no expectations. Just watch, be present, let go of needing anything to be different and just let it be.

The other approach is directing your attention onto something. For example, during the periods of silence you can pay attention to how your breath feels going through your nostrils. Or feel sensations somewhere in your body.

Let me know if you have any other questions.

Katea
June 12, 2018
Comment:

You're taking the first steps to looking inward rather than finding comfort in external distractions, so firstly be proud of yourself that you're here! So many folk pacify their monkey mind through junk food, alcohol, television, social media, computer games, smoking, consuming stuff, which just adds to the clutter rather than add value to their life. It's all a form of self medication because we would rather do anything than be alone with our destructive thoughts. As David explains, it's baby steps to re train your brain, there is no quick fix here but building gentle layers which form a solid foundation through which you begin to trust yourself. You're being brave, you're showing up and you're certainly not on your own!

branwine
June 14, 2018
Comment:

That is why you call it practice. You will in time be able to stop your mind from wondering. Even the most experienced in meditation will still have a wondering mind. The long pauses are a good lesson in being kind to yourself and know that it is ok if your mind wonders. Just come back to your center. Keep practicing. It has improved my life for years. And remember be kind to your self. Our minds are a powerful thing. You will get it and when you do you will find that peace. it does not happen over night. Namaste and be well!

bukrey
June 30, 2018
Comment:

Day 4. Hard to keep going. Only pain numb tingling. When you say let go. What do you do. Shake your limbs to release or what? I don’t share cause people have walked away in mid sentence. I appreciate that David and other DoYogaWithMe staff have answered me in the past. I appreciate the anonymity of this forum. Thanks

David Procyshyn
July 2, 2018
Comment:

Hi there. Sure, you can shake your limbs! Particularly if they are going numb. But, just to clarify, when I encourage you to let go I mean that I want you to stay with body sensations long enough that you feel them throughout your body, then let go of the tension. Feel it, let go. Feel it, let go. And do your best not to be hard on yourself if your mind goes somewhere else. Forgive, relax, be ok with the way that you feel and let it pass.

AnnMoir
August 5, 2018
Comment:

Thank you so much for the meditation exercises David. I’ve realky benefitted from them. I’ve noticed I have a preference to use the left side of the brain and I’m now trying to bring the right side more into play. I wonder if it’s common for an imbalance to occur and if there are particular exercises to create a balanced mind.

David Procyshyn
August 6, 2018
Comment:

Thank you for the feedback. It's sweet of you to share. I'm curious to hear how you experience the imbalance between your right and left brain.

ampghac21
September 14, 2018
Comment:

Hi , I am suffering from manic depression and have been on meds. I feel my life is not worth living and smoke like a crazy person. I need help but I am from India and such help requests, leads one to be admitted to a mental asylum. Please guide me as where can I start for meditating

David Procyshyn
September 17, 2018
Comment:

Hi there.
Thank you for being so honest. It's difficult to do that.
I think it's most important to realize that you are not alone. Many people feel the same sense of pain and a feeling that life is not worth living. This feeling is shared, across the world and among many people who live close to you.
It's really important to begin with being ok that you don't understand what's happening, and also being ok with feeling the way you do. That can feel condescending and ridiculous when coming from someone who doesn't know what you're going through, but it is the first real step toward creating a more positive relationship with the pain.
I would recommend that you try my series on letting go of anxiety - it will apply to your situation as well. Here's the link:
https://www.doyogawithme.com/content/learn-let-go-anxietys-grip-your-li…
At the end I talk about moving on to a program that is part of our subscriber offering. Have you tried that program, but the way? Have you tried the meditations above?
Take care,
David

Barbara Johnston
November 14, 2018
Comment:

David, I have been using your above meditation for some time now and want you to know it has immensely helped me. Thank you so much. Your work is appreciated.
Barbara

lizacollins
January 3, 2019
Comment:

this is an amazing meditation, appreciate the clarity in what David is saying. I have only done the first one and plan to do it every morning before starting my day to transform my anxiety and self doubt! Thank you!!

Katsiaryna
January 23, 2019
Comment:

I found this meditation very usefull and pain relieving, especially when it was said about forgiveness. I found out that I needed to forgive myself, my inner pain got output. I began to vet, but it was cry og relief and freedom of self-judgment. Thank you so much for this usefull tecknique and for what you do.

Wendy Drew
July 18, 2019
Comment:

David,
As a follower since 2017, wherever I travel in pursuit of taking time to rest the body and seek release, those three
short audios on meditation (anxiety) make such an impression. Essentially listening to one audio helps seek calm,
and a quiet mind. The presence of your voice has been a consistent presence on long flight overseas, or simply taking
30 minutes on the couch. The benefits have brought clarity and focus to me physically ( stomach inflammation)
and mentally. It's like self help with another voice in the room. Thank you so very much.

@JernYoga
August 7, 2019
Comment:

Thanks David! Really great, outstanding, meditation and I can compare with many, many other guided meditations. "Stop seeking answers" stuck with me. Such an important concept/thought. And thank you for DYWM!!!

Sanne
June 11, 2020
Comment:

Thank you so much! Stop seaking for answers! Yes, this might be the key! But how do you actually stop??

Atheness
August 4, 2020
Comment:

Your meditations and voice are magical. So clear and honest. I am able to go deeper than I've been able to before. I am gaining an awareness of self work I still have to do, but also appreciation for the unacknowledged work that has been done. Namaste

jms22
August 23, 2020
Comment:

I love these meditations and have used them for years. I often stay with one and then switch, utilizing their calming effects to start my day or to fall asleep. I find them fresh even after years of listening. Perhaps that is because the directions so completely tune me into my body, and my body is different each time I listen.
Thank you David!
Sometimes I inadvertantly touch the screen and wish I could adjust where I am during the meditation rather than start completely over. For instance just now I moved my position & in picking up my phone touched the screen & a whole new meditation started. I wish I could join back up with where I was in the meditation I was immersed in. If I have time I simply start over, trying to stay in the moment.
Thank you for these timeless meditations.